Why “Moral Injury,” Like “PTSD,” Is a Term That Applies to Far More Than Our Soldiers, and Why That’s Important to All of Us

I recently finished reading the book What Have We Done: The Moral Injury of Our Longest Wars, by Pulitzer-prize-winning war journalist David Wood (Little, Brown, 2016). When my husband brought it home from the library my interest was piqued because I hoped it might give me insight into why the abusive situations I’ve known about involved what seemed like a disproportionately high percentage of abusers who were military veterans. Continue reading “Why “Moral Injury,” Like “PTSD,” Is a Term That Applies to Far More Than Our Soldiers, and Why That’s Important to All of Us”

Tullian Tchividjian, Tom Chantry, BJUGrace, and Gossip

In the beginning, I had a little blog called Here’s the Joy on which I just wanted to blog about the Christian life and the wonderful truths of the power of the Holy Spirit, Christ in us, the Hope of glory. I was happy with my eight readers, and life was (relatively) uncomplicated.

Then I began to interact more and more with abuse survivors and those who blog about abuse. That does have a way of upending your world, doesn’t it? I may still have only eight readers, but my blog has taken a turn.

So yesterday I was supposed to be working on the publishing policy for Justice Keepers Publishing and other fun things, but I got waylaid for a bit by someone’s blog post with links and more links. Eventually it led me to a blog where I had a spirited discussion with the blog admin, who had said we should keep silent regarding scandals such as that about Tullian Tchividjian and Tom Chantry, because otherwise we are breaking the ninth commandment, “thou shalt not bear false witness.” Continue reading “Tullian Tchividjian, Tom Chantry, BJUGrace, and Gossip”

What I Learned from the Picture On My Grandmother’s Wall

found-by-walter-hunt

When I was growing up, this picture hung on my grandmother’s wall. I remember studying it as a child, absorbing the story that it tells.
The helpless lamb. The faithful shepherd dog calling for help.
The vultures in the background just waiting for the dog to give up and trot away to the warmth of home.
One day as I was cleaning out a closet, I came across that very picture–I had forgotten that I had it. I studied it again, and all the same feelings washed over me, but now even more.
This dog has only limited ability to help the lamb himself, but he’s trusting that the shepherd will come and complete the rescue.
We, the Church, are to be like that shepherd dog. We are commissioned to guard and protect helpless and endangered souls.
And as we do, we call on the Shepherd to come and complete the Rescue. He is the only one who can do so.
And when He comes and takes the lamb on His shoulders and says to his friends, “Rejoice with Me, because I have found My sheep that was lost!” we will be there, rejoicing with Him.
This, my friends, is real, true Christianity. When it is walked out in faithfulness, it is a beautiful thing.